Lamu port project launched for Ethiopia and South Sudan

Construction has begun on a $23bn (£14.5bn) port project and oil refinery in south-eastern Kenya’s coastal Lamu region near war-torn Somalia’s border.

An oil pipeline, railway and motorway will also be built linking Lamu to South Sudan and Ethiopia.

Newly independent South Sudan plans to use Lamu as its main oil export outlet.

A BBC reporter says security concerns for the project may explain the presence of Ethiopian and Kenyan troops in Somalia aiming to pacify the region.

‘Biggest African project’

Kenya’s leader Mwai Kibaki launched the project along with his South Sudanese and Ethiopian counterparts, Salva Kiir and Meles Zenawi respectively.

“I have no doubt that this day will go down in history as one of the defining moments – when we made a major stride to connect our people to the many socio-economic opportunities that lie ahead,” AFP news agency quotes Mr Kibaki as saying at the inauguration ceremony.

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lamu port kenya
There have been protests against the port by some environmentalists and residents of Lamu island

Known as Lamu Port South Sudan Ethiopia Transport Corridor (Lapsset), it is expected to be completed within four years with initial costs coming from the three governments and plans to attract international investment.

Steven Ikuwa, the administrator in charge of Lapsset told the BBC the scale of the plans was huge.

“I am proud to say this is one of the biggest projects that we are carrying out in Africa.”

The BBC’s Noel Mwakugu in Lamu says there are worries about the impact of the project on Lamu district, which is one of East Africa’s most beautiful and relatively unspoiled environments along the Indian Ocean and includes a cultural heritage site on Lamu Island.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mg6BTG2zTdU

 

“Lamu is a living heritage. Already Unesco has declared Lamu a World Heritage Site – as an endangered site,” Mualimu Badi from the Save Lamu group told the BBC.

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“If 500,000 people come to work as workers, we stand to lose that status.”

Mr Badi also said local residents fear they would be made homeless by the project as most people in the area are unable to prove their right to live in their homes.

In response to these complaints, Mr Kibaki has announced that residents will be issued with land title deeds and his administration will provide training for 1,000 young people to prepare for future opportunities presented by the port.

Oil export alternatives

Our correspondent says Lamu’s 32-bearth port will be five times larger than Kenya’s only other Indian Ocean port, Mombasa – which has been struggling to serve the needs of landlocked countries to the south and west of Kenya. READ More on BBC NEWS

 

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